We're Hiring! Join a 2022 Top Workplace

Coming together to celebrate Men’s Health Week

Coming together to celebrate Men’s Health Week

International Men’s Health Week is celebrated annually as the week leading up to Father’s Day. The week is intended to bring awareness of preventable health problems for males of all ages through the encouragement of early detection and treatment of health difficulties. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 14.9% of men aged 18 and over are in fair or poor health. With a percentage so high it is important to bring awareness of this international holiday by spreading facts, raising awareness on the importance of preventable care, and encouraging our loved ones to schedule those annual wellness exams and screenings. 

The leading causes of death in males are heart disease, cancer, and unintentional injuries. Annual screenings and tests are some of the most important precautions you can do for your overall health. For a more in depth list of these annual exams, head to our website where you can learn more, and book your annual wellness check up today. 

How can I participate in Men’s Health Week?

  • Get moving. Make it a priority to move your body. Whether that means taking 30 minutes out of your lunch break to go for a walk or downloading a new fitness app to keep you motivated. You can also challenge a friend or family member to a fun fitness challenge to help to keep each other accountable. 
  • Plan a ‘Wear Blue Day’. Pick a day within the week for your office or group to wear blue as a symbol for men’s health to show your commitment to the cause. You can also post on social media using the hashtags #ShowUsYourBlue and #KnowYourManFact
  • Know your blood pressure. One reason to visit your doctor regularly is to have your blood pressure checked. Normal blood pressure for adults are numbers below 120/80 mm Hg. To understand what is considered normal, as recommended by the American Heart Association, head here
  • Schedule your annual wellness exam. According to a study conducted by the Center of Disease Control, women are 33 percent more likely to visit the doctor than men, and women are 100 percent better at maintaining screening and preventable care. Let’s break this statistic by marking the calendar or reminding our loved ones that it is that time of the year again to make our annual visit to our primary care physician. 

 

This year there is a particular focus to prevent the spread of Coronavirus. Be sure that you are practicing good hygiene, staying home if you are not feeling well, and being proactive with your mental health. If there is a symptom that you are experiencing that is worrying, schedule an office visit or telemedicine appointment, if preferred, from the comfort of your own home.